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[SUSE 10.1 + 5500] HOWTO
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 9:49 am Reply with quote
old_skul
 
Joined: 06 Nov 2006
Posts: 19




Not sure where to post this - but if anyone needs a SUSE 10.1-specific HOWTO for use with a 5500, here's mine. I ran into several gotchas that took hours of fiddling to figure out, so if this helps anyone - great! Feel free to PM me with corrections or comments.

-------------------------------------------------

Installing MythTV on Suse 10.1

A while ago, I thought to myself, "Hey. We have TV cards for the PC working in Windows. Why not Linux?" Right about that time, the TiVo came out, followed quickly by ReplayTV (of which I am still a proud subscriber).

A few months after that, a small project called MythTV came onto my radar. It was still pretty new - but apparently, it worked, and people were recording television with it and playing it back either from their hard drives or recording shows to DVD. I was pretty excited about this. But, I thought, I don't have any real Linux skills - I'm a Windows guy!

Fast forward a few years. I finally decide to build a home theater PC with some spare parts I've got - an old Abit Intel motherboard, a spare P4 2.8 GHz CPU, some PC3200 RAM. I toss it all in a case, throw in a 200GB PATA hard drive I bought by mistake (it's a long story), and start surfing. By this point in time, I've done things like install Red Hat 9 and played with Mandrake (now Mandriva), and at work, messed around quite a bit with Suse Linux, just after they were bought out by Novell. So I decided to go the Linux route.

A few months later I feel like I've been through Linux boot camp. I'm ready to take my LPIC exam now, thanks. There is not nearly enough documentation out there on building a Linux HTPC with the hardware and software choices I made! But I bet it's like that for a lot of folks. There seems to be a lot of HOWTOs for people running distros like Gentoo or Ubuntu or even Mandriva - but precious few for Suse Linux. And since that's my distro of choice, I've decided to lay out a complete HOWTO on installing a Suse HTPC.

A couple of notes: I used MythTV 0.19 to build this, after running into seemingly insurmountable problems with 0.20svn. Also - I know that there are 0.20 Suse 10.1-specific RPMs - but they don't work with DVB/HD, so they're useless for pcHDTV users.

A disclaimer: I don't take any personal responsibility for actions taken by people reading this guide. It's your box, you fix it!

The Components

I used an old P4 motherboard - an ABIT BD7-II-RAID that was given to me, and a cheap ($50) 2.8 GHz CPU. I threw in 512MB of RAM and a 200GB PATA hard drive, a Creative Audigy SE, and that's about it.

Researching which TV tuner card and which video card to use turned up a couple of favorites. I knew I wanted to do HD, since I already have an SD ReplayTV unit that I wanted to continue using. And since I can't get HD satellite TV (damn those trees in my southern skies!), I was limited to over-the-air HD. Which is fine - because the OTA HD signals were way higher quality than my satellite provider would have given me.

I chose the pcHDTV 5500 TV tuner, from www.pchdtv.com. The card is reasonably priced and is a dedicated NTSC/ATSC tuner. It's also a Linux-only product - and support is limited to getting answers through the forums on the pcHDTV site. It was scary territory, but the card is the latest generation, and most likely to pick up the most stations over the air for me. I live in an urban area, but in a valley with a hill between my home and the transmission towers for most of the city, so reception was a key thing for me. The latest generation of cards recieves HD signals much better than the last.

For a video output card, I chose the nVidia 5200 series, in the EVGA flavor. The reasoning for this is simple: I did not plan to play video games on this HTPC, nor do I need 3D acceleration of any kind. However, this particular series is well-supported by nVidia in Linux, and in particular it supports their XvMC extensions, which provides acceleration for HD in particular. A necessity was a DVI output for my projector - why try to do HDTV over S-Video? Plus, it was fifty bucks - who can complain about that?

The Plan

I wanted an HTPC with which I could receive my local stations on reliably, and also be able to record two stations while watching another. This is no easy task for a computer - but with the help of pcHDTV's tuner cards and nVidia's XvMC, it's a do-able task. The two tuner cards can easily stream an HDTV mpeg2 signal to the hard drive while simultaneously displaying an mpeg2 stream - so I knew my hardware would work out.

Suse, however, was a problem - there was no reliable HOWTO available for using these new-fangled pcHDTV cards. So it took some trial and error - including a bout with Knoppmyth, a couple of tries with versions of MythTV that simply wouldn't compile happily with pcHDTV - but in the end, it all works.

So you want to use Suse, and get HDTV? Read on.

Install Hardware

Have your PC put together with all hardware with the exception of your pcHDTV card(s). Because of potential driver messes, leave them out of the system for now. But have the PC put together with sound and video cards installed.

Install Suse

This is a basic install of Suse 10.1. There's two versions of this great operating system - the original, and the "Remastered" version. This is a simple way of saying "Fixed", because the original release of Suse 10.1 was flat-out broken. The software updater didn't work at all! So use the remastered version to install.

So download 10.1 Remastered, burn it to a DVD, and let's get installing. Reboot your system to start.

Choose the Expert tab. Then, choose Partitions. Select Custom Partition.

Do no accept the hard drive partitioning proposal. Instead, set up a / partition, ext3, 20gb. Also, set up a /myth partition, ext3, using the remaining space. It's important to change the default "Reiser" partitioning format to "ext3" because of the fact that Myth creates *huge* files for HD recording. Reiser takes forever to delete files like this, while ext3 works much better.

Okay out to the main selection screen. Select Accept, and okay the hard disk partitioning. Complete the installation.

After reboot, accept defaults for the network installation. Apply a root password. Finally, do and online test and update. Let the operating system choose which updates to apply!

Select User Management at the user window. Add a personal user (you) and a "mythtv" login with password "mythtv". Click Accept at the hardware config screen. The installer will offer to install kdetv, alevt, and nxtvepg. You can if you want. Click Finish.

Install essential software packages

There are several software packages that the various components require. After the system is installed, it's convenient to use Yast to install them. So - run Yast. Go to Software and pick Installation Source. Add the Packman repository using the http protocol: packman.iu-bremen.de, directory suse/10.1 - click Accept when done.

Packman is a third-party installation source for Suse; they basically provide software packages for your 10.1 distribution that are up-to-date. They also have plenty of repositories that work with pcHDTV.

Now click Software Management. At the Package Management screen, click Search from the dropdown box and search for/install the following packages:

gcc
kernel-source
zlib
zlib-devel
mysql
freetype2-devel
xorg-x11-devel
qt3
qt3-devel
qt3-mysql
lame
dvb
xine-lib
xine-ui

Note those last two - xine-lib and xine-ui. Go ahead and install them now, even though we cover their compilation and installation later. There's dependencies in there we need.

A lot of "automatic changes" will be proposed by the Yast installer. Accept them. If you intend to watch DVDs on your PC, install libdvdcss by typing:
"rpm -ivh http://download.videolan.org/pub/libdvdcss/1.2.9/rpm/libdvdcss2-1.2.9-1.i386.rpm"

You may want to check for a newer version. That's the latest as of this writing.

Install pcHDTV Drivers

I'm assuming the use of a pcHDTV 5500, which is pcHDTV's most recent product for HDTC reception. It includes a CD with the installation directories for drivers, players, and tools. There's even a Windows set of tools - but what use are those?

Let's start by copying the /linux directory from the pcHDTV installer CD to your desktop. You can also download from online. Now, open a terminal and su to root by typing "su -" and entering the password. Go to the /home/<yourusername>/Desktop/ directory.

Enter "chmod -R 755 linux" to make the directory and its contents writeable for you. Now, cd to the "linux/drivers/kernel-2.6/kernels-2.6.12-and-higher/v4l-dvb" directory. Type "make && make install" to build and install the driver.

Install DVB Tools

Now cd to tools/FedoraCore/dvb-app of your Desktop linux directory, and type "make && make install". This wil install the critical dvb apps.
Now cd to tools/FedoraCore/dvb-atsc-tools-1.0.3 of your Desktop linux directory.
Again, type "make && make install". Some other dvb apps will be installed.

Install your pcHDTV 5500 Card(s)

It's time to install the hardware. Now that the drivers are installed, they should pick up the cards during boot with no intervention. For now, shutdown your machine and install the cards. Remember to wear your fancy anti-static wrist strap, if you have one. If not, just avoid rubbing the cat for a bit.

Bring your machine back online. Open a terminal, su to root, and type "dmesg | grep DVB" and you should see the following message:

DVB: registering new adapter (cx88[0]).
DVB: registering frontend 0 (LG Electronics LGDT3303 VSB/QAM Frontend)...

If you have more than one card, you'll see:
DVB: registering new adapter (cx88[1]).
DVB: registering frontend 1 (LG Electronics LGDT3303 VSB/QAM Frontend)...

Now try “dmesg | grep 5500”. Here’s my output:

CORE cx88[0]: subsystem: 7063:5500, board: pcHDTV HD5500 HDTV [card=47,autodetected]
CORE cx88[1]: subsystem: 7063:5500, board: pcHDTV HD5500 HDTV [card=47,autodetected]

To test the card, type "dtvsignal 35" or some other appropriate channel number. It will initialize the first card and try to tune it to that channel, and show the signal strength. Don't know what channel to tune to? Try www.antennaweb.org; its mapping program will show you which channels are available in your area.

Install the nvidia driver

If you have an nvidia video card - and I recommend it for this purpose - install the driver. It's simple with Suse.
Open a terminal and su to root. Type "init 3". This will drop you out of X. Now type "tiny-nvidia-installer --update", and it will install the driver. Accept all the defaults. It will automatically download the most up-to-date driver for you. Reboot the machine by typing "Reboot". When the machine comes back up, you should see an nVidia splash screen.

Note to nVidia users: I had to actually create a file called /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/XvMCConfig. In this file, the name of the driver is required. So, the contents of the file is:

libXvMCNVIDIA_dynamic.so.1

Later versions of the nVidia drivers may make this unnecessary.

Install HD Xine

Xine is a critical component of MythTV, so it's important to have it installed and working correctly. Return to the /home/<yourusername>/Desktop/linux directory, and go to: players/FedoraCore/xine/xine-hd-lib-1.1.1

Type: "./configure", and check the output for errors. Now type "make && make install".

Switch to the players/FedoraCore/xine/xine-hd-uii-0.99.4 Again, type "./configure", checking the output for errors. Finally, type "make && make install".

Start xine by typing "xine". Ignore any errors. Open the setup screen and select "xine-hd" as your skin, and close xine. Not seeing output is normal at this stage!

Now, add your local channels to xine by typing "dtvscan -fx -o ~/.xine/channels.conf" You will see the channels scanned; it will write these channels to the channels.conf file. You'll have to perform this step for every user you intend to use xine with - root, your personal user, the mythtv user, etc., as it writes that channels.conf file into the users' home directory.

Now, open xine again, and select "DVB". You should be able to tune channels at this point using your scroll wheel and clicking. Otherwise, click the "menu" button, and click "up" or "down" and then "select" to change channels.

You may want to open the setup screen again in xine, and select "xvmc" as your driver, if you have an nVidia video card and wish to use this cpu-saving driver - for my system to be watchable, I had to. In xine, hit "I" to select deinterlacing; it will make 1080i video look substantially better. You can also select the type of deinterlacing in the xine setup screen.

Install MythTV

And now, the meat and potatoes! We've installed operating systems, drivers, even Xine HD, and seen HD in action. Go to the mythtv.org site and download version 0.19 of MythTV, MythTV Plugins, and MythTV Themes. This is fairly standard stuff; just download it to your Suse Desktop and expand it there using "tar xvf <filename>". You can use the built-in Suse tools too - I'm just using what I learned.

Why 0.19? Well, I ran into problems with the release of 0.20 on Suse 10.1. In particular, I could not install the cards in MythTV as DVB cards using the publicly released version. I was able to if I compiled the "svn" version of MythTV 0.20, but even then, attempting to make an Input Connection resulted in error messages ("Failed to open card", etc.). If you know the solutions to these problems, please let me know, and I'll rewrite this guide for 0.20.

0.19, however, compiles without a hitch in Suse 10.1 - so let's stick with that for now.

Expand the mythtv source in a directory. To configure, you must know the location of the pcHDTV frontend.h file. Find it by typing "find / -name frontend.h". Look for the directory v4l-dvb in your /home/<yourusername>/linux directory. The frontend.h file is essentially a configuration file for your tuner card.

Now export a couple of variables so the make can find qt3. Type "export QTDIR=/usr/lib/qt3" and "export PATH=$QTDIR/bin:$PATH".

Use the following line to configure the build:

"./configure --enable-proc-opt --enable-dvb --dvb-path=/home/<yourusername>/Desktop/linux/drivers/kernel-2.6/kernels-2.6.12-and-higher/v4l-dvb/linux/include/linux/dvb/frontend.h --enable-xvmc"

Note that dvb-path does not include the "linux/include/frontend.h" part of the frontend.h file path. That's because ./configure is already set up for that part of the path, and just need to know the location of that directory.

Check the output for errors. If you got the dvb-path wrong, it will complain about that first thing. Also, only add --enable-xvmc if you have an nVidia card with the drivers installed.

If everything looks good, type "make && make install", and wait for a while. It'll take some time to compile. If for any reason you need to stop the make or the install, start over by typing "make distclean" and run the configure/make/make install commands again.

Set up MySQL

MythTV uses MySQL to store not only its configuration but also its program guide. So we have to make sure Suse starts MySQL when it boots, and we have to initialize the database with some basic information that MythTV can work with.

As root, start mysql by typing "/etc/init.d/mysql start". Watch for errors. Set up a root password by typing "mysqladmin -u root password <yourpasswordhere>".

Now, initialize the myth database by typing "mysql -u root -p < /home/<yourusername>/Desktop/mythtv-0.19/database/mc.sql". Enter your password. You should see no output - this is a good thing!

Set up a Zap2It Labs account

Where do you think you'll get your TV listings? Well, for now, there's a free service, provided by Data Direct. Thanks guys! Go to labs.zap2it.com, and set up an account. The account eventually expires, but the good news is that you can renew it every quarter by taking a questionnaire. Zap2It will allow you to select which channels you'd want listing information for, and it's free, too boot. Set it up with your zip/postal code, and select which channels you'd like to monitor.

Set Up MythTV

At a prompt, type "mythtv-setup". This will initialize the setup program. Accept all the defaults the first time through as Myth finds the MySQL database.

Now, add your tuner card(s). Go to Capture Cards and navigate to Card Type and select DVB. The 5500 card will be listed as an LG unit. Accept the defaults. if you have to add a 2nd card, do so at this time, selecting card (1).

Now add a Video Source. Here you can enter your Zap2It account information to get free XMLTV listings.

Go to Input Connections, and select an input. Select the Video Source you just set up as the source, and scan the channels. You have to do this for only one card. Then, select Fetch Channels From Listing Source. And wait. And wait. It will get your initial listings from DataDirect.

Exit out, and run mythfilldatabase. Go get dinner or something as it fills the database with XMLTV listings.

Once it's done, type "mythbackend &" and see the output "Seems to be woken up by USER". You're just about ready to watch MythTV!

Install Themes and Plugins

MythTV has plugins for things like music, playing DVDs, watching your NetFlix queue, and playing ROM games. I really didn't want any of these things, so I elected to disable many of the plugins. Type "./configure --help" to see which of the plugins you might want or not want; each plugin can be enabled with "--enable-<pluginname>" or disabled with "--disable-<pluginnname>". Note - some of the plugins require dependencies that I haven't listed in this guide, so you're on your own installing them. I installed MythDVD, MythWeather, and the MythBrowser with no issues.

Once you've configured it, type "qmake mythtvplugins.pro" to set up qmake, then "make && make install" to install them.

For themes, the situation is similar: Just type "qmake mythtvthemes.pro" to do the basic config, and then "make install" (note: no "make" is necessary) to install the themes. I actually downloaded my favorite theme, "Retro", available from http://www.aldorf.no/mythtv at no charge. You simply download a theme, expand it, and drop it in Myth's themes directory, located in /usr/share/mythtv/themes.

Enjoy

Finally, type "mythfrontend" and use the keyboard to select the various items. Usage of Myth is covered in the official Myth documentation, so I'll let you explore from here. Enjoy!

There's a few more things you could do in Suse to complete the installation - for instance, start mythbackend on boot of runlevel 5, as well as mythfrontend. Regardless, it's your system, and up to you how you want to use it. In addition to being my HTPC, this Myth box is also my home gateway and proxy server as well. I can connect to it from anywhere in the world and listen to my library of music, and even download the shows recorded in Myth remotely and watch them elsewhere. So enjoy your box and do something cool with it!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 12:24 pm Reply with quote
waterhead
 
Joined: 24 Apr 2005
Posts: 299




You don't have to install MythTV from source. After installing SuSE 10.1, I installed the Smart Update Manager and the Smart GUI. I then update the distro using Smart. Then install MythTV using Smart. There are two repositories that have MythTV 0.2 for SuSE 10.1. One is the packman repository, the other is Oeystein repository.

I have installed MythTV on SuSE 10.1 using both of them, and they both work.

On the other hand, I am not using the HD-5500 card, just the HD-3000.

http://folk.uio.no/oeysteio/

http://en.opensuse.org/Additional_YaST_Package_Repositories

The reason for using Smart instead of Yast is because in the original release of SuSE10.1, the update manager was not working. That has been fixed in the newest release, but I now like Smart better than Yast, and keep using it.

Paul

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Mythbuntu 8.04
Intel D875PBZ main board
Pentium4 3.06Ghz
1024GB RAM
nVidia 6600GT
pcHDTV HD-3000
Air2PC PCI
MythTV 0.21
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 1:47 pm Reply with quote
old_skul
 
Joined: 06 Nov 2006
Posts: 19




Good input. Yes, the reason I needed to compile Myth was because I'm using a 5500. Since it's a pure DVB card (albiet with NTSC hooks too), the way Myth does its capture cards required a full compile.

Since Myth 0.20svn didn't work properly for the input connections, I resorted to 0.19.

Two things need to happen: First, we need an update to 0.20 (it'll probably be called 0.21!) that accomodates the HD-5500. Once we have that, we need someone smarter than me to make RPMs of the install (with dvb enabled) that we can all download.

As it stands, Suse 10.2 alpha 5 is using 2.6.18, which includes kernel support for the HD-5500, so that's good. But what we're really waiting on is Myth itself. Hopefully Mr Richards will get on it soon!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 3:17 pm Reply with quote
waterhead
 
Joined: 24 Apr 2005
Posts: 299




I use the HD-3000 as a DVB card. DVB is a standard option in MythTV.

I guess since I don't have the HD-5500, I can't understand the problem.

Good work on the HOW-TO. I've asked for the administrators to make stickies of important posts like yours. But nothing ever happens (no suprise there).

_________________
Mythbuntu 8.04
Intel D875PBZ main board
Pentium4 3.06Ghz
1024GB RAM
nVidia 6600GT
pcHDTV HD-3000
Air2PC PCI
MythTV 0.21
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 3:25 pm Reply with quote
old_skul
 
Joined: 06 Nov 2006
Posts: 19




See, that was the strange thing - DVB wasn't an option in the locally compiled version of Myth 0.20. When I downloaded 0.20svn, I was able to see that option, but when trying to set up the input connection got "Failed to open card". Of course, I went through the motions of making sure no other app had the card open - no dice. 0.19 worked like a charm.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 8:27 am Reply with quote
flerchjj
 
Joined: 06 Dec 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Dayton, Ohio




I am using the HD-5500 card and had no trouble installing & using myth 0.20 from the Packman repository. If you've followed the previous steps you can just go to Yast->Software Management and search for myth. Select any desired plugins and the mythtv app. I think I got 2 copies of the frontend because I selected both mythtv and mythtv-frontend. There will be a standard DVB option in mythtv-setup. The pchdtv option did not work.

Also don't forget to go to Yast->System->System Services (Runlevel) and enable required services for mythtv at system start. Two services that you might want to start automatically are mysql and mythbackend.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 1:40 am Reply with quote
Bigchris
 
Joined: 18 Apr 2006
Posts: 15




FWIW, I've got two HD-3000s and a PVR-350 running on Suse 10.2 using Packman's .20 RPMs. XvMCConfig moved to /usr/X11R6/lib in this release and Mythfrontend looks for it in a totally bogus place, /usr/etc/X11, but I beat that by adding a symlink to where it actually resides from where MythTV was looking for it.
ln -s /usr/X11R6/lib/XvMCConfig /usr/etc/X11

LIRC using the PVR-350's remote is looking like a bigger headache because having the IR driver in the kernel created some extra complexity but it's looking doable, just a little more perverse than usual.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 1:30 am Reply with quote
old_skul
 
Joined: 06 Nov 2006
Posts: 19




Bigchris wrote:
FWIW, I've got two HD-3000s and a PVR-350 running on Suse 10.2 using Packman's .20 RPMs. XvMCConfig moved to /usr/X11R6/lib in this release and Mythfrontend looks for it in a totally bogus place, /usr/etc/X11, but I beat that by adding a symlink to where it actually resides from where MythTV was looking for it.
ln -s /usr/X11R6/lib/XvMCConfig /usr/etc/X11

LIRC using the PVR-350's remote is looking like a bigger headache because having the IR driver in the kernel created some extra complexity but it's looking doable, just a little more perverse than usual.


You know, one thing that would be really helpful is for you guys to post the URLs to the repositories you're using. The packman URLs I have may have been bad, since my install of 0.20 simply didn't work - there was no options in mythtv-setup for the DVB cards - so how about helping a brother out?

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 8:10 am Reply with quote
flerchjj
 
Joined: 06 Dec 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Dayton, Ohio




old_skul wrote:
You know, one thing that would be really helpful is for you guys to post the URLs to the repositories you're using. The packman URLs I have may have been bad, since my install of 0.20 simply didn't work - there was no options in mythtv-setup for the DVB cards - so how about helping a brother out?


I originally went to the Packman URL that you posted. Maybe you need to refresh the installation source or something.

To find mirrors of the packman repository, recommended by Suse, go to http://www.opensuse.org/ and search forpackman or packman repositories

The article I found said:
OpenSuse - Additional YaST Package Repositories wrote:

Packman offers various additional packages for openSUSE. Please use a mirror if possible:

To import the GnuPG key issue the following command as root:

rpm --import http://packman.unixheads.com/suse/10.2/gpg-pubkey-1abd1afb.asc

Type - rpm-md/repomd
Protocol - HTTP
Server name - packman.iu-bremen.de
Directories - suse/10.0/ for openSUSE 10.0
- suse/10.1/ for openSUSE 10.1
- suse/10.2/ for openSUSE 10.2
Mirrors for openSUSE 10.2 - Australia Belgium Germany Germany Germany Germany Romania USA USA

They suggested using http://packman.unixheads.com/suse/10.2/ for the US.
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 12:50 pm Reply with quote
flerchjj
 
Joined: 06 Dec 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Dayton, Ohio




Make sure you have configured and selected a video source in MythTV before scanning for channels in the MythTV setup. Failure to connect to card may result otherwise.

Not correctly setting this may have been a source of errors for some people trying to use myth 0.20 from the repositories.
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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 10:39 am Reply with quote
Fredford
 
Joined: 07 May 2007
Posts: 1




When I try to install the drivers I get errors that say files not found. It does the same thing when I try to install xine and other stuff that I moved from the cd.

I'm using Ubuntu 7.04, with HD-5500.

I thought there must be something wrong with this card so I decided to put MS XP back on my hard drive. The weird thing is I can get the windows drivers to work on XP and watch TV, but I can't even install the Linux drivers on Linux Ubuntu. This is a Linux card isn't it?

Fred
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Suse 10.2 driver compile
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 8:17 pm Reply with quote
aco_pa
 
Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 2




I am using Suse 10.2 2.6.18.2-34-default #1 SMP i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

When I follow the instructions for compiling the drivers I get...

creating symbolic links...
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.18.2-34-default/build SUBDIRS=/home/anthony/Desktop/linux/drivers/kernel-2.6/kernels-2.6.12-and-higher/v4l-dvb/v4l modules
make[2]: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.18.2-34-obj/i386/default'
make[2]: *** No rule to make target `modules'. Stop.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.18.2-34-obj/i386/default'
make[1]: *** [default] Error 2
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/anthony/Desktop/linux/drivers/kernel-2.6/kernels-2.6.12-and-higher/v4l-dvb/v4l'
make: *** [all] Error 2

Any ideas what is happening
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[SUSE 10.1 + 5500] HOWTO
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