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Best way to crop/scale back to "full" (4:3) screen
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2005 10:29 pm Reply with quote
chips & sauce
 
Joined: 03 May 2005
Posts: 13




I'm guessing a lot of people face the same issue, but I'll try to outline it anyway...

Outside of prime time almost all the programming I can receive is originally 4:3. The local stations 'wrap' that in a 16:9 HD envelope - this creates bars on the left and/or right sides. Usually these bars are black.

My output device is a regular (4:3) TV. If I tell xine to use the full screen this generally results in a shrunken down 4:3 image in the center of the screen with large black bars on all sides. (I.e., left, right, top, and bottom.)

I realized that a properly chosen -G parameter will get the 4:3 programming most of the way back to covering the full screen. The basic idea is something like this:

xine -B -G 1066x600-133+0 -C 48.1 dtv://

If you try this (and you have an 800x600 desktop) you will notice that this does not quite get rid of the last slivers of the bars on the left and right, and it might leave in things like vbi signals across the top. By enlarging the window a little more and adjusting the offsets you could push that stuff the rest of the way off the screen.

Here are my questions:

Is this the best way to do this? Is it the only way?

The xine man page mentions these things called "post plugins" - but I can't actually find any useful documentation on them. (E.g., what they do, what their parameters are, etc.) Are there any xine post plugins that would be useful in cropping and scaling in real time? If the post plugins are documented, where is the documentation?

How have the rest of you xine gurus done this?

Please let me know what you think.

Thanks.
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 1:34 pm Reply with quote
Scott Larson
 
Joined: 15 Oct 2003
Posts: 713
Location: Portland, OR




I just hit the z key to zoom in until the the screen is full.
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:13 pm Reply with quote
chips & sauce
 
Joined: 03 May 2005
Posts: 13




Thanks for the tip - I had not tried that. It seems to work reasonably well in a sort of incremental, interactive way. (Although when I zoomed back out the other way until the screen got to a size of zero my X session disappeared and I was suddenly back at the login screen...)

I should probably have mentioned that part of what I am interested in is how various things are affecting my CPU and system utilization. For example, I suspect that using the -G option on the command line or the interactive zoom with z/Z gives results that look about the same and that present about the same load to the machine - but I don't actually know that for sure.

I thought I was in the clear CPU-wise until I enabled the TV out on my video card and tried to drive both my monitor and TV with some full screen output. It worked, but there were fairly regular hitches. I had not yet experimented with xvmc, so I tried that and, fortunately, it seemed to put me back on the plus side... But I'd like to make sure I'm not making any 'mistakes' anywhere...

I would still like to know about the "post" plugins if anyone knows where I can find information on them.

Thanks again.
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Best way to crop/scale back to "full" (4:3) screen
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